WS 101 M/W- Cora Agatucci

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WS 101 Online Assignments
dialogues study guides online student study guides
guest presentation assignments
discussion papers
online student discussion paper
final self-reflection

Dialogues Directions vary and will be explained in class (see WS 101 Syllabus and Course Plan). When handouts have been given in class, online versions will also be posted here.

Dialogue #1 - Course Goals & Responses online handout:
1. Briefly introduce yourself.
2. Explain why you elected to take this course, WS 101—beyond satisfying a humanities "B" list requirement or other program requirements. In your explanation, please comment on whether you have studied women and gender before in any of your previous courses at college and/or in your previous education.
3. Read through the WS 101
Syllabus and Course Plan—with special attention to "Key Course Questions and Learning Objectives" (WS 101 Syllabus, pp. 1-3). Then list any of the course questions/objectives that you share and/or find particularly valuable.
4. Also propose any additional course learning goals that you personally would like to achieve this term in WS 101.
5. Describe your learning style: that is, under what conditions and/or with what kind of learning activities and assignments do you feel that you learn most effectively? In your response, you may wish to comment on the teaching styles of instructors that seem to help you learn best, and/or how well you work and learn with other students in large class, teamwork, and/or small group situations.
6. After reading the WS 101 syllabus and course plan, also review the Table of Contents (and perhaps skim the contents) of the WS 101 Packet—with special attention to the list of scheduled WS 101 Speakers and Presentations (packet, p. 1). Consider also Cora’s opening day introduction to the class. Then describe your responses to WS 101 so far. In describing your responses, please:

a. briefly explain why you are responding as you are whenever possible;
b. identify which aspects of the class particularly interest you;
c. pose any questions or sources of curiosity that you may have;
d. raise any concerns and/or objections that you may have;
e. tell Cora anything else that you believe would help us develop a constructive working relationship in WS 101 this term.

Dialogue #2 - Feminist position statement & contextualization exercise: Oral directions will be given in class (see WS 101 Course Plan and/or contact Cora: cagatucci@cocc.edu). For the first part, "Feminist Position Statement," I'd like you to use what you have learned from Cora's presentation "Feminisms Yesterday and Today" and the packet reading assignments to offer your definition of "feminism/feminist" and to speculate on what kinds/elements of the various feminist orientations and theories that you might endorse. For the second part, the "contextualization exercise," (which was partially demonstrated in clas), see Cora.

Internet Explorations (for PC) online handout:
On Netscape, "Home" (on COCC Pioneer computers)= COCC Home Page
URL:
http://www.cocc.edu
Exploration #1 – Cora’s WS101 Webpages

  1. Click "People"
  2. Click "Faculty"
  3. Click "Cora Agatucci"
  4. Cora’s Home PageURL: http://www.cocc.edu/cagatucci
  5. Scroll up and down the page to see what’s offered.
  6. Click "Schedule" (Cora’s current teaching schedule (hyperlinked), office hours, & other commitments)
  7. Click "Classes" (Cora’s current term hyperlinked courses: scroll up and down the page for other courses and course related information and links)
  8. Click our class to go to its syllabus page. At top of the syllabus page, you will find links to course-related webpages; Visit the Course Plan and other course-related pages linked to the syllabus page. Note: if you click "Cora Agatucci," you will be returned to Cora’s Home Page. You can also click "Back" or "Forward" in the Netscape menu at the top of the computer screen to move back and forth between the previous webpages viewed.
  9. Click "WS Links"
  10. Explore some of the hyperlinks to websources on women’s and gender studies on the World Wide Web (WWW).
  11. Click "WS Timelines":
  12. Explore some of the hyperlinks embedded in the WS Timelines.

If you have time here are some more possible explorations:

Looking for online help with writing and research? Go back to Cora’s Classes page and click the link to "Resources for Writers and Researchers": scroll up and down the page and click hyperlinks to visit sites of interest.

Exploration #2: COCC Library Research via Infotrac 2000 Periodical Database

  1. Return to any of Cora’s webpages and click the "COCC" icon at the top of the page. This will return you to the COCC Home Page.
  2. Click "Library" on the COCC Home Page
  3. Scroll down until you find "Search Periodical Databases: and click.
  4. Click "Infotrac 2000 Search Bank"
  5. Click "Proceed" button.
  6. Click "Expanded Academic ASAP 1995" (Jan 1998 with access to 1980-1993)
  7. Think of a subject that you would like to research.
  8. Click "Subject Guide" (or you can click the "key word" option if you want to view only periodical articles that have that key word in them.
  9. Type in the Subject that you want to search (e.g., "Chinese film") and press the "Enter" key on your keyboard.
  10. Scroll down the list of articles contained in the Infotrac 2000 database and click "View" for any that you want to read. At the top you’ll be told how many articles have been retrieved—these are the most recent articles. At the bottom of the page, you can click "Next page" to see more articles if they don’t all fit on current page. You’ll also find an icon for any Back articles (older articles back to 1980 on the subject): click that icon if you want to explore further.
  11. To start a new Infotrac search, you can click "Back" Netscape button at the top of your computer screen until you are returned to the initial search page (see steps #7-8 above).

Exploration #3 – WWW Search Engine: Alta vista

  1. At the top of your Netscape terminal screen, click "Search"
  2. Scroll down the page until you locate "Alta Vista" under "Search Engines."
  3. Click "Alta Vista."
  4. Type in a subject or key words that you would like to search on the World Wide Web.
  5. The first listings on Alta Vista will be those that contain all the words you typed in somewhere on the referenced websites. Scroll down the page and click on any that look interesting and/or promising.
  6. At the bottom of the screen, you will find numbered icons to additional pages of websites related to your search. Click "2" and move on through the websites.
  7. Happy websurfing!!

Dialogue #3 - Internet explorations: Oral directions for Dialogue #3 will be given in class (see WS 101 Course Plan and/or contact Cora: cagatucci@cocc.edu), but essentially I'd like you to discuss some of the links related to Women's and Gender Studies (via Cora's WS 101 website: WS Links and WS Timelines) that you visited and what you learned from the internet exploration exercise.

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Study Guides online handout: Three (3) Study Guide assignments, some individual and some group, will be assigned this term in connection with selected WS 101 Presentations (see WS 101 Syllabus and Course Plan). After the Study Guides are completed, copies will be distributed in the form of handouts and/or posted on Cora’s WS 101 website so that all members of the class can all benefit from them in constructing our shared understanding of studies in women and gender, and to help students prepare for WS 101 Discussion Papers and the Final Self-Reflection.

Part I: Briefly summarize or outline 3 to 5 main points (using complete sentences!), and define any key terms and concepts introduced in the assigned presentation (including any assigned reading and/or other learning aids/activities).

Part II: Pose 3 to 5 follow-up "Questions for Thinking and Discussion" (and/or make provocative statements about the presentation that will encourage active response from others)

Part III: Compare-Contrast this presentation to others; then pose some questions and/or make some statements that suggest meaningful similarities and/or differences you see between this assigned presentation, and other presentations and/or course materials. Goals:

Part IV: Propose one or more topics and/or questions raised but not answered by the assigned presentation that you consider worth "Further Study and Research" (someday...)

Cora will prepare a sample Study Guide on her own presentation, "Feminisms Yesterday and Today" as a guide (see below). See also

online student study guides

Sample Study Guide online handout:

(Please use this heading on the first page:)

Cora Agatucci (Your Name)
WS 101, Prof. Agatucci (Identify Course & Instructor)
Study Guide #1 (Sample) (Identify the Assignment)
January 27, 1998 (Date Due)

Study Guide for "Feminisms Yesterday and Today" (Week #2)
(Offer a clear title, naming the Presentation and the Week of the Term)

(Identify the Presentation fully, and any related assignments)
Speaker:
Cora Agatucci
Date:
Tuesday, January 13, 1998
Reading/Related Assignments
: WS 101 Packet: Read (& annotate!) "What Is a Feminist?" (pp. 38-39); & "Feminist Orientations & Theories" (pp. 40-48); Dialogue #2: Feminist Position Statement and "Contextualization" Exercise

Part I: Summary of Main Points and Key Concepts

A. What is a Feminist and Feminism? There is no single answer to this question for there are many definitions of "feminist"—including negative stereotypes of feminism, as defined by hostile non-feminists—just as there are many varieties of "feminisms." However, there is some common ground among those who define themselves as "feminists":

  1. Most Western feminists might endorse Annette Barnes’s definition (WS Packet p. 38), especially that women are not inferior to men, that women should have rights equal to men’s, and that much study and open re-evaluation remains to be done to determine exactly what females and males are and how they are different.
  2. Many academic feminists would share the underlying assumption that traditional education and knowledge is androcentric (male-centered) and biased to women’s disadvantage-- one reflection of the inequitable patriarchal (literally, "rule by the fathers") systems of Western societies that have traditionally tended to undervalue, overlook, and disadvantage females (see "The Difference It Makes," WS 101 Packet, p. 38)
  3. Many academic feminists would endorse common general goals and methods (described in WS 101 Packet, pp. 38-39) in their studies of women and gender.

B. What are the varieties of (Western) Feminisms? Some of the major "Feminist Orientations and Theories" of U.S. feminisms are outlined in the WS 101 Packet (pp. 40-48).

  1. Two major orientations are (1) those that center women (gynocentric) and focus on gender differences; and (2) those that minimize gender differences to focus on common (androgynous, or female and male) qualities.
  2. Readings of Women’s Studies Timelines in the also show that feminisms each has a history, developing in response to a particular historical/cultural context, and shaping and reflecting changes in that climate over time.

a. For example, "liberal feminism" reflects its roots in Enlightenment thinking and the age of the U.S. and French Revolutions, and predominated the thinking behind the U.S. Woman Suffrage movement of the 19th and early 20th century, with its emphasis on the rights (to vote, especially) of the individual, whether female or male.
b. More recent varieties of feminisms—e.g., "Multicultural," and "Global"—reflect a contemporary widening of feminist thinking and concerns to encompass the great cultural diversity among women (and men) of our globally interconnected world, as well as other factors besides gender—like class and race—in their lives and cultures that may subordinate and disempower them.

C. "Gender" (that female and male nature, roles and expectations are "learned" through "nurture" and socialization, rather than biologically and unchangeably determined by our "sex" at birth) is an important concept in many feminisms —potentially revolutionary and threatening to the status quo. If we have learned our "gendered" identities and roles, we can unlearn them and change the inequities patriarchal gender systems produce.

D. "Contextualization" is a feminist concept stressing the importance of examining the "contexts" that shape individuals, as well as movements and theories—especially self-examination of one’s own "context"--to understand where we and others "are coming from" (see WS 101 syllabus, #4, p. 3) and how our "contexts" are influencing our personal and professional lives, beliefs, attitudes, perspectives, etc.—for example, whether or not we might define ourselves as "feminist" and, if so, what kind of "feminist" we might be.

  1. Cora began a "contextualization" exercise in class: she first had to think of the many aspects of her identity that seemed significant—especially in terms of conferring privilege or disadvantage in our society (e.g., woman, U.S. citizen, "white," working class, heterosexual, etc.). We all have "gender," but also many other "identities" that have advantaged or disadvantaged us in our culture and society.
  2. Cora then tried to classify each of these identities as a "+" factor, tending to give her a privileged position in our society (e.g., "assimilated" white, heterosexual); or as a "-" factor, that would tend to disadvantage her in our society (e.g., woman, working class); or as a neutral or "+/-" factor (sometimes advantageous, sometimes not).
  3. Cora identified herself as an "inclusive feminist" (see WS packet, p. 47) and began to suggest some of the "identity" factors in her past experiences that have led her to this kind of feminism.
  4. Cora also cited a quotation from Toni Morrison: "Definitions belong to the definers" to suggest the power that lies in taking control of—as well as responsibility for--the ways that she defines herself, rather than letting other people define what she is—e.g., as a "feminist"—for her.

Part II: Questions for Thinking and Discussion
1. What is the value of feminism(s)—feminist theories/orientations, goals, methods, and criticisms of society and education? Or are they valuable? Why or why not?
2. What can Cora’s "contextualization" exercise teach us about ourselves—and others? Some possibilities to consider:

  1. Such an exercise can help us realize the ways we are privileged that we might otherwise overlook, as well as the identity factors that we are conscious of as having disempowered us (since we are usually very painfully aware of instances of discrimination against us). So what? Why is it important to realize how we might be "privileged" and/or "disadvantaged"?
  2. How do you deal with difference—gender or other differences? How have others dealt with your difference—gender or other kinds of differences among your many identities? Do you see any correlation between what you have discovered about yourself by doing the "contextualization" exercise and how you deal with others who are different from you? How should we deal with others who are different from ourselves?
  3. If it is too simplistic (and sometimes inaccurate) to say, "I am woman; therefore, I am a victim of our patriarchal gender system"; or "I am man; therefore, I have all the power in our gender system" –then exactly how significant is "gender" and "sex" in determining who has power and who is subordinated, or in creating the inequities and injustices, in U.S. society?
  4. Were the identity factors that Cora identified, and/or those we identity in Dialogue #2, products of "biology/nature" or "nurture/socialized learning"? How much control and choice do we have over what we are?

3. Go back to the "Key Course Questions and Learning Objectives" described in the WS 101 Syllabus, pp. 1-3. Did Cora’s presentation on "Feminisms Yesterday and Today" seem to help you start to answer any of the questions and/or meet any of the learning objectives described in the syllabus? What about any personal course goals you identified in Dialogue #1? Which ones and how? What kind of "answers" are you now beginning to formulate?

Part III: Compare-Contrast this Presentation to Others: Questions & Observations
1. How has feminism influenced academic studies in women and gender? Gender is one key concept that came up in Cora’s opening day presentation on Women’s and Gender Studies, as well as "Feminisms Yesterday and Today." What are other recurring/important concepts and/or themes that have emerged so far?
2. Which of the speakers in the film Gender: The Enduring Paradox seemed to be "feminists" and why? And speculate on what kind of feminist—using the definitions and categories presented in the WS Packet--do you think they might be (e.g., Wanda Coleman or Ursula LeGuin)? The videotape also provided some glimpses into different cultures "gender" systems—for example, the 4 "genders" of some Native American groups. How does that gender system compare/contrast to Western "patriarchal" and "heterosexist" gender systems?
3. Keep in mind the definitions of "feminist" and the varieties of "feminisms" introduced in this presentation and the reading when listening to future WS 101 speakers: see if you recognize any of the feminist orientations (e.g., gynocentric putting women on center stage, and/or exploring gender differences), theories, and goals at work. Look for the use of the concept of "gender" (vs. "sex") and evidence of the influence (positive or negative?) of feminist thought and goals in future WS 101 presentations. It would also be interesting to ask the speakers directly whether or not they consider themselves "feminists" and, if so, how they define "feminist/feminism." Or, if not, why not, and again, how they define the "feminist" they are not.

Part IV: Further Study and Research
1. Cora stated that the definitions and types of feminisms described in the WS 101 packet were not "exhaustive." What are some of the other ways people have defined "feminist" and what are other categories of "feminism"?
2. Cora also confined her discussion primarily to Western feminisms. What kinds of "feminisms" have developed in non-Western countries and multicultural cultures among non-Western and "multicultural" women? Explore the notion of "ethnocentrism" in relation to Western feminisms. Are most other (non-Western) cultures "patriarchal"? If so, have these gendered cultural systems disadvantaged females in the same or different ways?
3. What can we learn from studying other cultures’ gender systems? Can such study help us understand our own culture and its gender systems better?

Evaluation Form for Study Guides online handout: Each of the three Study Guides is worth 10% of course grade, as stated in the WS 101 Syllabus
(This form, based on the assignment directions above, will be used to evaluate and grade Study Guides)

Evaluation Guide: Check Plus = Very Good; Check= Satisfactory; Check Minus = Poor

____Part I: 3 to 5 main points are concisely and clearly summarized or outlined, using complete sentences; and key terms and concepts are defined.
____Part I Goal
is successfully achieved: "to help students better understand the main points and key concepts of the presentation."

____Part II: 3 to 5 follow-up questions or provocative statements are proposed for "Thinking and Discussion"
____Part II Goal #1
is successfully achieved: "to stimulate critical and connected thinking, and engaged responses from students to presentation topics and approaches."
____Part II Goal #2
is successfully achieved: "to stimulate students to consider the personal and professional value and implications of the assigned presentation, taken separately and considered in relation to other presentations, in advancing and completing our understanding of women’s and gender studies."

____Part III: Questions and/or statements are proposed to suggest meaningful similarities and/or differences between this presentation, and other presentations and/or course materials.. Goals:
____Part III Goal #1
is successfully achieved: "to identify any recurring themes, issues, and/or patterns you see relevant to our studies of women and gender;"
____Part III Goal #2
is successfully achieved: "to guide students in considering significant similarities and differences among presentations and course materials in the kinds of knowledge, personal and professional perspectives, and methods used to approach women’s and gender topics."

____Part IV: One or more topics and/or questions raised but not answered by the presentation are proposed as worth "Further Study and Research"
____Part IV Goal
is successfully achieved: "To give a focus for and provoke interest in further inquiry and research—for those students who may wish to continue their studies of women and gender beyond WS 101."

Note: One (1) late Study Guide (group or individual) will be accepted late with no penalty, as stated in the WS 101 Syllabus. Any additional late Study Guides will be penalized one letter grade.

Revision Option: WS 101 students have the option to revise one study guide to try to improve their grade. The original graded Study Guide should be resubmitted with the Revised Study Guide for grading. No specific deadline will be given for optional revisions, although they must be turned in no later than the last day of class.

Advice for Preparing Study Guides online handout:
(Or, How to Earn an "A" or a "B" on a WS 101 Study Guide)

Note: Each Study Guide is worth 10% of your WS 101 course grade. One (1) late Study Guide (group or individual) will be accepted late with no penalty, as stated in the WS 101 Syllabus. Any additional late Study Guides will be penalized one letter grade.

Revision Option: Especially since this assignment is new and unfamiliar to most of you, you will have the option to revise one study guide to try to improve your grade. Please see Cora to clarify any questions or confusions you may have about the assignment directions, expectations, and/or grading. The original graded Study Guide should be resubmitted with the Revised Study Guide for grading. No specific deadline will be given for optional revisions, although they must be turned in no later than the last day of class. And try to apply what you have learned regarding the strengths and weaknesses of your first Study Guide to the preparation of future Study Guides. Don’t forget the Jefferson or electronic Writing Lab as an additional resource to help you with this and other writing assignments.

(Identify the Presentation fully, and any related assignments made by that speaker: EXAMPLE:)
Speaker:
Cora Agatucci
Date:
Tuesday, January 13, 1998
Reading/Related Assignments
: WS 101 Packet: Read (& annotate!) "What Is a Feminist?" (pp. 38-39); & "Feminist Orientations & Theories" (pp. 40-48); Dialogue #2: Feminist Position Statement and "Contextualization" Exercise

Part I Directions: 3 to 5 main points are to be concisely and clearly summarized or outlined, using complete sentences; and key terms and concepts are defined.
Goal
:
"to help students better understand the main points and key concepts of the presentation."

Part II Directions: 3 to 5 follow-up questions or provocative statements the presentation should be proposed for "Thinking and Discussion."
First, some of you are having trouble distinguishing the directions and goals for this Part from those for Parts III and IV (see also below). Let me try to clarify—and consider the function of helpful Study Guides you may have used in the past. In Part II, try to stick to what was covered and how it was covered in the actual presentation itself.

Remember the goals stated for Part II:
Goal #1:
"to stimulate critical and connected thinking, and engaged responses from students to presentation topics and approaches."
Goal #2
: "to stimulate students to consider the personal and professional value and implications of the assigned presentation, taken separately and considered in relation to other presentations, in advancing and completing our understanding of women’s and gender studies." Also, then, consider posing Part II questions and/or making statements about:

Part III Directions: Propose questions and/or statements to suggest meaningful similarities and/or differences between this presentation, and other presentations and/or course materials." This part of the Study Guide is asking you to:

I am assuming that well-prepared active learners have done their homework, have been in class regularly, and have been attentive: if this statement doesn’t describe you, however good your reasons are, you must recognize that you will be at a disadvantage in completing Part III successfully (and perhaps other parts as well).
Remember the goals stated for Part III and let them guide you:

Goal #1 "to identify any recurring themes, issues, and/or patterns you see relevant to our studies of women and gender;
Goal #2: "to guide students in considering significant similarities and differences among presentations and course materials in the kinds of knowledge, personal and professional perspectives, and methods used to approach women’s and gender topics."

Part IV Directions: Propose one or more topics and/or questions raised but not answered by the presentation and worth "Further Study and Research"
Goal
: "To give a focus for and provoke interest in further inquiry and research—for those students who may wish to continue their studies of women and gender beyond WS 101." Again, some of you seem to be confused about how Part IV is different from Part II and III (see above), so let me try to clarify further:

Bear in mind that WS 101 is an introductory course, intended to introduce women’s and gender studies (what it is, the kinds of topics it covers, the kinds of approaches and methods people use to study it). This kind of course favors breadth to give students a sense of the range of the field (rather than depth in one limited topic), and is also intended to provide a foundation and a focus to identify topics of interest in the field you believe worth further study and research, and to point toward directions for investigation of new topics and/or introduced (old) topics in more depth.

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Guest Presentation Assignments online handout:

Week #2 & #3 Assignments: Please add the following assignments to the WS 101 Course Plan. If you feel overwhelmed, please prioritize your time and energy. Do the following first. Then get to the other Week #2 and #3 homework assignments (e.g., WS 101 Packet readings) when you can. -Cora

1. DUE this Thurs., 1/15 Questions & Topics for Steve O’Brien (for PC) on "Male Responses to the Women’s Movement": Write out your responses and questions to these questions to help Steve tailor his presentation to your interests and background:

This could be based on formal reading you've done or on news coverage you've seen (e.g. Robert Bly's book, Iron John or gatherings of "mythopoetic" men on TV; news coverage of the Promise Keepers' movement; accusations of "reverse discrimination" in child custody or employment ). Or it could be based on personal discussions you have had with men concerning feminism, and/or with other women about men's response to feminism.

2. DUE Tues., 1/20 Leslie Minor-Evans’ Presentation: "Women and Psychology: Why We’ve Been Ignored, What We’re Doing Now"

Halonen, Jane, and Santrock, John (1997). HUMAN ADJUSTMENT (2nd ed.). Dubuque, Iowa: The Times Mirror Higher Educational Group, Inc., Brown and Benchmark, Publishers.

This reading addresses these topics and subtopics, according to Leslie: "defining gender (changing American landscape, history of psych research on gender, feminist perspective), gender comparisons (gender roles, role transcendence, stereotyping, similarities and differences), gender identity (from 4 psych perspectives), sociocultural variations (men's issues, ethnicity & gender, culture & gender)."

Week #5 & 6 Assignments: Please add the following assignments to the WS 101 Course Plan. If you feel overwhelmed, please prioritize your time and energy. Do the following first. Then get to the other homework assignments (e.g., any WS 101 Packet readings) when you can. -Cora

1. DUE Tues., 2/3: Read handout "From the Ancrene Riwle" for Eleanor Sumpter-Latham's presentation, "Women's Culture in the Middle Ages." (Contact Cora to obtain the handout.)

2. Thurs., 2/5:
A. We will probably be meeting in
Hitchcock Auditorium for Jennifer Greene's slide presentation, "Renaissance Women Artists." (Please contact Cora to confirm.)

3. DUE Tues., 2/10: Read handout "Eunuchs, Gender, and Power" for Patricia O'Neill's presentation. (Contact Cora to obtain the handout.)

4. DUE Thurs., 2/12: Questions on Women's Health Issues for Margaret Peterson (please respond in writing for P.C.):

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Discussion Paper #1 online handout

Janet Student [your name]
WS 101, Prof. Agatucci [identify course & instructor]
Discussion Paper #1 [identify assignment]
February 10, 1998 [date due]

Discussion Paper #1: Directions, Topics, and Evaluation Criteria

  1. Suggested Length: 4-5 typed/wordprocessed and double-spaced pages; or 6-8 legibly handwritten, single-spaced pages. Please type or write on only one side of a standard-sized (8 " X 11") white paper. Leave one inch margins at the top, bottom and sides of each page. Use the heading above placed in the upper left-hand corner of the first page of your discussion paper. Type or write your last name and the page number in the upper right-hand corner of the second and each subsequent page of your discussion paper.
  2. Discussion Paper #1 is worth 15% of your course grade. Review Late policy on discussion papers given in the WS 101 syllabus.
  3. Choose one of the following topics as the subject of your Discussion Paper:

TOPIC #1: After four weeks in WS 101, how would you now define Studies in Women and Gender? In Discussion Paper #1, formulate an initial response to this leading course question (#1) posed in the WS 101 course syllabus*.

a. Limit yourself to three or four defining features of such studies, grounded in your experience of Weeks #1-4 course presentations, reading materials, and learning activities--approached as practical demonstrations of the kinds of knowledge and perspectives about women, gender, and humankind that such studies generate.

b. Explain and illustrate each your defining points with well-selected specific examples. Your discussion paper should include at least one specific example from three of the following:

c. In concluding your discussion paper, speculate on the value and/or limitations of studies in women and gender, as you currently understand it, and explain your evaluation.

* To arrive at some defining features in response to the above leading question "What is women’s and gender studies," it may be helpful to review and respond to one or more of these supporting questions posed in the course syllabus: "How do different academic disciplines, professional fields, as well as personal perspectives, represented by WS 101 presentations [including the film and related reading assignments and learning activities] study and understand women and gender? What kinds of topics, questions, problems, and issues do they pose for study? …What kinds of knowledge about women and gender do they produce? How/why is each valuable in help us understand women and gender better? And what are the limitations of each?"

TOPIC #2: Where are you coming from? Where are others coming from? What can we learn from our differences, as well as our similarities? In Dialogue #1, many of you identified this set of leading questions from the syllabus as most significant to you. To begin to respond to these three leading questions, review some of your strongest responses to and/or meaningful learning experiences with WS 101 presentations, readings, class/small group discussions thus far, as part of an ongoing "dialogue" you are having with "others" (whether you were reacting to the views of the instructor, guest presenters, readings, and/or other WS 101 students) on concepts, issues, and/or questions of women’s and gender studies.

Identify three personally meaningful "moments" in this ongoing WS 101 "dialogue" thus far that have helped you better understand "where you are coming from," and how/why your own perspective may be similar to and/or different from the viewpoints of "others" on one or more key course concepts, issues, and/or questions in the study of women and gender. For each of these "moments" that you introduce in Discussion Paper #1:

a. Identify the issue, question, or concept in women’s and gender studies being addressed and its source(s)—i.e., the presentation, reading, and/or class or small group discussion where it came from);
b. Describe your response and explore the reason(s) behind your viewpoint on the identified issue/question/concept; and
c. Compare and/ or contrast your own viewpoint/response to the perspective(s) of one or more "others" (real and/or imagined) on that issue/question/concept.

In concluding your discussion paper, speculate on the value to you—and possibly to others—of this exercise in trying to better understand "where you are coming from" and how that may be different and/or similar to "where others are coming from" on the identified issues/questions/concepts in women’s and gender studies.

4. Evaluation Criteria: The grade and points your Discussion Paper earns will primarily be determined by the following evaluation criteria:

(1) good faith effort to follow directions and to address all parts of the selected topic;

(2) evidence of thoughtful response to and serious engagement with the questions addressed in the discussion paper, and to use this assignment as a meaningful learning experience;

(3) evidence of thorough acquaintance with, understanding of, and ability to apply course concepts and ideas, drawn from class presentations, readings, and/or discussion, as relevant to the chosen topic;

(4) your ability to offer insightful analysis in developing your points and/or to synthesize in meaningful ways different course materials with your own ideas/experiences, as relevant to the chosen topic;

(5) ability to support, explain, clarify and illustrate your opinions clearly and convincingly with clear explanation, sound reasoning, and relevant, well-selected specific examples/evidence; and

(6) ability to express your ideas clearly, coherently, and effectively so that a diverse WS 101 readership, coming from many different perspectives and levels of awareness, could follow and understand your points. (Note that errors in grammar, usage, punctuation, and mechanics will not normally damage your grade unless they interfere with the clarity and sense of your communication.)

Discussion Paper #1 Evaluation Formonline handout

Evaluation Guide: Check += Very Good; Check= Satisfactory; Check-= Needs Work

___1. Demonstrates a good faith effort to follow directions and to address all parts of the selected topic (or the alternative topic proposed and approved by Cora in advance)
___
a. Suggested Length & Manuscript Format: 4-5 typed/wordprocessed and double-spaced pages; or 6-8 legibly handwritten, single-spaced pages—or the Discussion Paper is as long as it needs to be to get the job done well. A good faith effort has been made to follow the manuscript format described in the directions handout.
___b. Addressed All Parts of the Assigned Topic (from the two choices given in directions handout or an alternative topic that you proposed to Cora in advance. (In class, I also offered the option of proposing to me an alternative topic if you don’t like the two topic choices given below).

_______TOPIC #1 chosen: How do you now define Studies in Women and Gender?
In responding to this leading course question, the Discussion Paper does the following:

___a. Limited to three or four defining features of such studies (grounded in your experience of Weeks #1-4 course presentations, reading materials, and learning activities--approached as practical demonstrations of the kinds of knowledge and perspectives about women, gender, and humankind that such studies generate).
___b. Each of these 3 or 4 defining points is explained and illustrated with well-selected specific examples

___c. Examples are drawn from including at least three of the following:

___d. The conclusion of the Discussion Paper speculates on the value and/or limitations of studies in women and gender, as you currently understand it, and explains your evaluation.

_______TOPIC #2 chosen: Where are you coming from? Where are others coming from? What can we learn from our differences, as well as our similarities?

___1. Three (3) three personally meaningful "moments" identified in this ongoing WS 101 "dialogue" thus far that have helped you better understand

___2. For each of these "moments" that you introduce in Discussion Paper #1:

___a. You identify the issue, question, or concept in women’s and gender studies being addressed and its source(s)—i.e., the presentation, reading, and/or class or small group discussion where it came from);
___b. You describe your response and explore the reason(s) behind your viewpoint on the identified issue/question/concept; and
___c. You compare and/ or contrast your own viewpoint/response to the perspective(s) of one or more "others" (real and/or imagined) on that issue/question/concept.

___d. The conclusion of the Discussion Paper speculates on the value to you—and possibly to others—of this exercise in trying to better understand "where you are coming from" and how that may be different and/or similar to "where others are coming from" on the identified issues/questions/concepts in women’s and gender studies.

______Alternative Topic proposed and approved by Cora in advance.

____2. Evidence of thoughtful response to and serious engagement with the questions addressed in the discussion paper, and use of this assignment as a meaningful learning experience;

____3. Evidence of thorough acquaintance with, understanding of, and ability to apply course concepts and ideas, drawn from class presentations, readings, and/or discussion, as relevant to the chosen topic;

____4. Ability to offer insightful analysis in developing your points and/or to synthesize in meaningful ways different course materials with your own ideas/experiences, as relevant to the chosen topic;

____5. Ability to support, explain, clarify and illustrate your opinions clearly and convincingly with clear explanation, sound reasoning, and relevant, well-selected specific examples/evidence; and =

____6. Ability to express your ideas clearly, coherently, and effectively so that a diverse WS 101 readership, coming from many different perspectives and levels of awareness, could follow and understand your points. (Note that errors in grammar, usage, punctuation, and mechanics will not normally damage your grade unless they interfere with the clarity and sense of your communication.)

Discussion Paper #2 online handout

Janet Student [your name]
WS 101, Prof. Agatucci [identify course & instructor]
Discussion Paper #2 [identify assignment]
March 5, 1998 [date due]

Discussion Paper #2: Directions, Topics, and Evaluation Criteria

The Directions and Evaluation Criteria for Discussion Paper #2 are generally the same as for Discussion Paper#1.

  1. Suggested Length: 4-5 typed/wordprocessed and double-spaced pages; or 6-8 legibly handwritten, single-spaced pages. Please type or write on only one side of a standard-sized (8 " X 11") white paper. Leave one inch margins at the top, bottom and sides of each page. Use the heading above placed in the upper left-hand corner of the first page of your discussion paper. Type or write your last name and the page number in the upper right-hand corner of the second and each subsequent page of your discussion paper.
  2. Due Date: Discussion Paper #2 is due on Thurs., March 5, and it is worth 15% of your course grade. See Revised WS 101 Policies ("Logistics"): Discussion Papers turned in after March 12 cannot be revised.
  3. Topic: Address the following topic in your Discussion Paper #2, or propose an alternative topic to Cora.

TOPIC: Analyze and Evaluate Three Approaches to the Study of Women and Gender. As stated in the WS 101 syllabus (pp. 1-2), one defining feature of Women’s and Gender Studies is its interdisciplinary nature, and after 8 weeks you have been exposed to a variety of speakers and materials, topics and approaches, and related class learning activities. Compare and/or contrast at least two different WS 101 presentations and at least one reading (either one assigned by a speaker or one given in the WS 101 packet) in order to address the two tasks given below. Focus on differences and/or similarities among these presentations and reading that seem significant and meaningful to you, and be sure to explain why these differences and/or similarities seem significant to you. Examine specific examples from the presentations and reading to illustrate and support your points.

  1. Analyze how the chosen WS 101 presentations and reading are similar and/or different in their approaches to the study of women and gender.
  2. Evaluate the strengths and/or limitations of the chosen presentations and reading in terms of what each has contributed to your developing understanding of studies in women and gender.

(In selecting significant similarities and/or differences for your analysis and evaluation, you may wish to consider one or more of the following characteristics of the chosen presentations and reading:

Grading Criteria: The grade and points your Discussion Paper earns will primarily be determined by the following evaluation criteria:

(1) good faith effort to follow directions and to address all parts of the selected topic;

(2) evidence of thoughtful response to and serious engagement with the questions addressed in the discussion paper, and to use this assignment as a meaningful learning experience;

(3) evidence of thorough acquaintance with, understanding of, and ability to apply course concepts and ideas, drawn from class presentations, readings, and/or discussion, as relevant to the chosen topic;

(4) your ability to offer insightful analysis in developing your points and/or to synthesize in meaningful ways different course materials with your own ideas/experiences, as relevant to the chosen topic;

(5) ability to support, explain, clarify and illustrate your opinions clearly and convincingly with clear explanation, sound reasoning, and relevant, well-selected specific examples/evidence; and

(6) ability to express your ideas clearly, coherently, and effectively so that a diverse WS 101 readership, coming from many different perspectives and levels of awareness, could follow and understand your points. (Note that errors in grammar, usage, punctuation, and mechanics will not normally damage your grade unless they interfere with the clarity and sense of your communication.)

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Final Self-Reflection online handout

(1) Course Reflections:
Reflect back of the entire course learning experience this term, and address the following questions. Please explain or illustrate in some detail so I can understand why you are responding as you do.
A, What, to you, were the most beneficial aspects of the course? Why?
B. What was the most challenging aspect of the course for you? Why?
C. Do you now believe you had the prerequisite college-level reading, writing, thinking and listening skills needed to succeed in WS 101? Explain.
D, What aspects of the course would you suggest that Cora definitely do the same way the next time she teaches this course? Why?
E, What aspects of the course would you suggest that Cora change to improve or strengthen the course the next time she teaches WS101? Why?

(2) Course Goals:
Reflect back on WS 101 syllabus course goals and key questions, as well as your own personal course goals and expectations as stated in Dialogue#1.

A. Evaluate how well you have met course learning goals by circling the numbered and bulleted questions below that you now feel you could answer with some confidence in relation to women’s and gender studies:

1. What is Women’s and Gender Studies?

2. What is a feminist and feminism?

3. What are some of the multicultural and global dimensions of feminism and of women's and gender studies?

4a. Where are you coming from?
4b. Where are others’ coming from?
4c. What can we learn from our differences, as well as our similarities?
4d. How can we work together to deal more constructively with gender (and other) differences?.

2B. Review the personal course learning goals you formulated in Dialogue #1 and/or since the beginning of class. List those goals and evaluate each in terms how well you believe you have met them in Ws 101 this term.

(3) SELF-EVALUATION
Write concise but clear responses to the following:
A. Identify 3 to 5 of the most important criteria you use to judge a successful and satisfying learning experience for you in a college course.
B. Explain what you see as your role and responsibilities as a student for making that course learning experience successful and meaningful.
C. Evaluate your performance and learning experience in Hum 210, and assign yourself a grade, taking into account the criteria, student roles and responsibilities you have identified above for 3A and 3B.

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Address your questions and comments to cagatucci@cocc.edu

see also WS 101 Course Plan, WS Links and WS Timelines (hyperlinked!)

return to WS 101 Syllabus

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