REVISED AAOT Writing Requirements (effective Fall 2010),
& FAQ's
(Frequently Asked Questions & some Answers), including information on
REVISED 4-Credit WR 121, REVISED 4-Credit WR 122, & REVISED 4-Credit WR 227
URL of this web page:
http://web.cocc.edu/cagatucci/classes/wr121/REVAAOT_WR121_WR122.htm
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AAOT Writing Requirements have changed beginning Fall 2010.

From COCC Catalog 2010-11 > Pathways to Success: Overview of COCC Degree Options . . .
<http://current.cocc.edu/UserData/Documents/current/catalog/2010-11%20pathways%20pp35-49.pdf>:

"Significant changes in 2010-2011 AAOT requirements:
"Significant differences exist between the 2010-2011 AAOT degree requirements and previous requirements.  Students should consult with their advisor and/or the CAP Center for information on how these changes may influence their course selection. Students are eligible to earn the AAOT degree when they meet the degree requirements listed in any catalog in effect during the student's most recent continuous [i.e. unbroken]enrollment.  For the AAOT, however, this [option of which AAOT Writing requirements that continuously enrolled students may apply to fulfilling AAOT degree requirements] is limited to the current catalog and the previous four catalog years."
(COCC Catalog 2010-11, p. 39; emphasis added)

See also CAP Center > Academic Advising > 2010-11 AAOT Change Notes:
URL: http://cap.cocc.edu/Advising/201011+AAOT/default.aspx
Scroll down this web page to review "Frequently asked questions," including:
--"Can a student choose which degree requirements to use?"
For more information consult your COCC advisor and the COCC Catalog 2010-11


UPDATE, Jan. 2011: GOOD NEWS! LIB 127 is again being offered!!
COCC Credit Class Schedule - Spring 2011:
https://oraweb.cocc.edu/2011/201120/fullschedule.htm
LIBRARY - Spring 2011:
https://oraweb.cocc.edu/2011/201120/LIB.htm


QUESTION: Why have AAOT degree Requirements for college-level Writing changed?

ANSWER: Oregon state ‘s JBAC (Joint Boards Articulation Commission) recommended revisions to AAOT (Associate of Arts Oregon Transfer) degree guidelines, subsequently adopted by the Oregon state Joint Boards of Education (JBE) on May 2, 2008, to be implemented by Fall 2010. These revised AAOT degree guidelines include a reduced  8-credit “Foundational Requirement in Writing” and the expectation that “Information Literacy” will be embedded in appropriate “courses that count toward [AAOT] Foundational Requirements [i.e. Writing] or Discipline Studies”  (emphasis added).
Source: <http://www.ous.edu/state_board/meeting/dockets/ddoc080502-JB AAOT.pdf>

See also: Joint Boards Articulation Commission: The Articulation and Transfer Home Page for Transfer Students and Transfer-Student Issues: <http://www.ous.edu/state_board/jbac>

QUESTION: What are the changes in new AAOT degree Requirements and in college-level Writing courses, effective Fall 2010?

ANSWERS:
--The new AAOT degree requirements
--
now called GENERAL EDUCATION - Foundational Requirements”--for college-level Writing are: 
  • Minimum of 8 credits of college-level Writing, which must include:
  • WR 121* AND
  • WR 122* OR WR 227*
  • NOTES: The above and other required courses must still be completed/transcripted with a grade of "C" or higher to "count" toward satisfying COCC's AAOT degree requirements.  COCC still does NOT allow instructors to give a final course grade of "C-."

--*WR 121, *WR 122, and *WR 227 will each change to 4-credit courses beginning in Fall 2010:

  •  Essential LIB 127 outcomes will be embedded in these revised 4-credit college writing course instruction, and LIB 127 will no longer be offered.
    But also please see below on
    New transfer-elective LIB 199 and LIB 299 (1-CR) courses offered in 2010.
  • See below for more detailed information on revised course learning outcomes, assessments, major instructional topics and primary assignments of revised 4-credit WR 121, WR 122, and WR 227 college-level writing courses.

--WR 123: Only a limited number of 3-credit WR 123 sections will be offered through Spring 2011, primarily to enable continuously enrolled students eligible to complete old (pre-Fall 2010) AAOT college-level Writing requirements in effect and published in the past four years' COCC Catalog.

  • It is expected that 3-credit WR 123 will NOT be offered at COCC after Spring 2011. Pre-Fall 2010 continuously enrolled COCC AAOT degree-seeking students should take this fact into account AND consult their COCC academic advisor when planning their AY 2010-2011 class schedules.  See 2009-10 COCC Credit Class Schedule - WRITING:
    --Fall 2010: https://oraweb.cocc.edu/2011/201040/WRT.htm
    --Winter 2011: https://oraweb.cocc.edu/2011/201110/WRT.htm
    --Spring 2011: https://oraweb.cocc.edu/2011/201120/WRT.htm
  • Some essential college-level research writing knowledge and skills (taught in 3-credit WR 123) and informational literacy outcomes (previously taught in LIB 127), have been integrated into newly revised 4-credit WR 121, 4-credit WR 122, and 4-credit WR 227, effective Fall 2010.
    [
    See below for detailed information on revised course learning outcomes, assessments, major instructional topics and primary assignments of revised 4-credit WR 121, WR 122, and WR 227, effective Fall 2010.]

--For sources & more information on AAOT changes, see these COCC web pages:


QUESTION: How can students complete the AAOT writing requirement if they have already taken one or more of the old, 3-credit versions of college-level writing?

ANSWERS
  • AAOT minimum requirement of 8 credits of approved college-level Writing courses must be satisfied by ALL new, transfer, returning, and pre-Fall 2010 continuously enrolled COCC AAOT degree-seeking students.
  • Therefore, COCC AAOT degree-seeking students who have already successfully completed one or more of the old, 3-credit versions of approved college-level writing courses but the total credits for which fall below the AAOT required minimum of 8 credits, will need to successfully complete one or more additional approved college-level writing courses:

If student has already completed . . .

Then, the student also needs to take . . .

WR 121 (3cr)

WR 122 (4cr) AND
Either WR 227 (4cr) OR WR 123 (3cr, offered 2010-2011 only)

If student has already completed . . . Then, the student also needs to take . . .

WR 121 (3cr) AND WR 122 (3cr)

Either WR 227 (4cr) OR WR 123 (3cr, offered 2010-2011 only)

Source: CAP Center "2010-11 AAOT Change Notes"
URL: http://cap.cocc.edu/Advising/201011+AAOT/default.aspx


QUESTION: What are the learning outcomes, assessments, major course topics, & primary assignments for revised 4-credit WR 121, effective Fall 2010?

Answers:

HUMANITIES DEPARTMENT
COURSE TITLE:
English Composition
COURSE NUMBER: WR 121
COURSE CREDITS: 4

4-CR WR 121 Mandatory COURSE PREREQUISITES: A passing grade (C or better) in WR 65, 75 or 95, or a passing score on the placement exam

4-CR WR 121 COURSE DESCRIPTION: This transfer course emphasizes text-based academic writing and develops skills in expository and persuasive writing incorporating analytical reading, critical thinking, and credible sources.  Students compose several essays using a variety of strategies to support a thesis.  

WR 121 [4-CR] Course Learning OUTCOMES & Assessments:

Upon completion of this course, the successful student will be able to:

Outcome 1. Write for different audiences and various purposes.

Assessment:  Students' work demonstrates an understanding of situational contexts in which writing takes place:  the needs, values, and expectations of different audiences; and the writer’s purpose to primarily inform or persuade.

Outcome 2. Write clear, focused, coherent essays using the conventions of English grammar and style.

Assessment:  Students construct and use a thesis to shape well- developed essays that demonstrate proficiency, including effective tone, persona, diction, usage, idiom, and syntax.

Outcome 3. Search for and synthesize outside source material into written work*.

Assessment:Students' work demonstrates proficiency in finding, critically reading, summarizing, analyzing, and evaluating sources in order to responsibly incorporate facts, opinions, judgments, and data from research in their writing.

*Embedded Information Literacy Proficiencies 1, 3, & 8 -  Students will be able to:
--
Proficiency 1. “Identify gaps in their knowledge and recognize when they need more information.”
--Proficiency 3. “Evaluate and select information using appropriate criteria”
--
Proficiency 8. “Create, produce, and communicate understanding of a subject through synthesis of relevant information”
[See also below on New LIB 199 and LIB 299 courses in 2010]

Outcome 4. Demonstrate the ability to avoid plagiarism and use an appropriate documentation style.

Assessment:  In their essays, students effectively use summary, paraphrase, and direct quotation with the appropriate documentation to cite sources correctly and avoid plagiarism.

Outcome 5. Demonstrate an understanding of writing as a multi-stage recursive process.

Assessment:  Students are able to articulate the process-based approach they use to write essays that include steps such as invention, drafting, thesis formation, organization, revising, and editing.

Outcome 6. Demonstrate a familiarity with the basic rhetorical strategies in argumentative discourse.

Assessment:Students are able to identify, explain and evaluate basic structural components of written arguments such as claims, support and evidence, and refutation. Students also know and can deploy such basic rhetorical strategies as appeals to ethos, logos, and pathos and can effectively distinguish between legitimate and illegitimate modes of argument and persuasion.

Outcome 7. Evaluate their own and their peers’ writing.

Assessment:  Students complete at least one (formal or informal) written review of their own writing strengths and weaknesses, including effective self-prescriptions for improvement; and complete appropriate written reviews of peers’ drafts, including suggestions for revision and editing.

WR 121 (4-CR) Course Outline by Major Topics:

  • Developing expository essays and effective rhetorical strategies

  • Situational analysis

  •  Essay conventions

  • Finding and incorporating sources

  • Documenting correctly

  • Writing essays as a process

  • Becoming self-aware writers

 WR 121 (4-CR) Course PRIMARY ASSIGNMENTS

  •  2-4 written summaries

  • 3 essays, 4-6 pages in length, and one of which incorporates 3-6 sources

  • At least one argument analysis "grid' or outline

Rev. June 2010, 2009-10 Humanities Dept. Composition Committee


QUESTION: What are the learning outcomes, assessments, major course topics, & primary assignments for revised 4-credit WR 122, effective Fall 2010?

Answers:

HUMANITIES DEPARTMENT
COURSE TITLE:
English Composition
COURSE NUMBER: WR 122
COURSE CREDITS: 4

4-CR WR 122 Recommended Prerequisites: A passing grade (C or better) in WR 121 or equivalent coursework.

4-CR WR 122 COURSE DESCRIPTION: Using critical reading, observation, or investigation to explore topics in depth, student learn to incorporate, accommodate or refute other voices, use evidence and persuasion and follow patterns of reasoning to support their positions.

WR 122 [4-CR] Course Learning OUTCOMES, Assessments:

Upon completion of this course, the successful student will be able to:

Outcome 1. Analyze audiences and writing situations.

Assessment:  Students' work demonstrates understanding of the context in which writing is taking place: the needs, values, and expectations of different audiences; conventions of persuasive writing and means of persuasion; and cultural considerations.

Outcome 2. Demonstrate an understanding of and appreciation for controversy, debate, and diverse opinions, values, and viewpoints.

Assessment: Students analyze and report their analytical findings on written texts and other materials that engage controvertible topics, incorporating diverse viewpoints in written arguments on debatable issues.

Outcome 3. Identify and use sources appropriately, including evaluating information for accuracy and reliability.

Assessment: Students' work demonstrates proficiency in critically reading, analyzing, and evaluating sources in order to responsibly incorporate facts, opinions, judgments, and data from research.

 [See also below on New LIB 199 and LIB 299 courses in 2010]

Outcome 4. Demonstrate a command of the basic rhetorical moments in argumentative discourse.

Assessment: Students are able to identify, explain and evaluate basic structural components of written arguments such as claims, support and evidence, rebuttal and refutation, and final appeal (peroration). Students also know and can deploy such basic rhetorical strategies as appeals to ethos, logos, and pathos and can effectively distinguish between legitimate and illegitimate modes of argument and persuasion

Outcome 5. Demonstrate a command of basic principles of cogent, logical reasoning and argumentation.

Assessment: Students are familiar with basic principles such as non-contradiction and logical inclusion/exclusion, as well as common fallacies of generalization and irrelevancy and can evaluate and edit these in their own writing and the writing of others.

Outcome 6. Write ethically and responsibly.

Assessment:  Students demonstrate ethical considerations in their writing; act responsibly by using information technologies ethically, incorporating and crediting sources appropriately and without plagiarism, and by consciously avoiding inaccurate or misleading information.

*Embedded Information Literacy Proficiency 5 -  Students will be able to:
--Proficiency 5. “Ethically and legally use information and information technologies.”
[See also below on New LIB 199 and LIB 299 courses in 2010]

Outcome 7. Manage a substantial research writing project.

Assessment:  Students create research strategies that focus investigation and analysis on a discrete, manageable topic in a field of appropriately sophisticated inquiry; find information by using academic research methodologies, tools, and materials; develop an effective system of note-taking and drafting that avoids plagiarism and fairly represents sources; demonstrate such integral tasks as research proposal, preliminary bibliography, and outline; and develop competence in one system of documentation

*Embedded Information Literacy Proficiencies 2, 4, & 7: Students will be able to:
--Proficiency 2. “Find information efficiently and effectively, using appropriate research tools and search strategies”
--Proficiency 4. “Treat research as a multi-stage, recursive learning process”
--Proficiency 7. “Manipulate and manage information, using appropriate tools and technologies.” 
[See also below on New LIB 199 and LIB 299 courses in 2010]

Outcome 8. Work collaboratively.

Assessment:  Students build responsible teamwork skills in peer editing and other group tasks germaine to argumentative writing; they provide peers with suggestions for revising and editing.

WR 122 (4-CR) Course Outline by Major Topics:

      Defining argumentative writing and its relevance in academic work, civil polity, and practical tasks of business and administrative activity

       Analyzing the structure of written arguments

       Using analytical summaries to evaluate evidence, support, logic and logical fallacies; legitimate and illegitimate modes of argumentation

       Planning, writing, organizing, revising, and editing formal written arguments

       Research proposal

       Preliminary [annotated] bibliography

      Research argument incorporating formal documentation and references to multiple research sources

WR 122 (4-CR) Course PRIMARY ASSIGNMENTS:

         An evaluation essay: 4-6 pages in length

         A research proposal

         An annotated bibliography: 8-10 sources

         A final research paper: 8-10 pages in length, incorporating 5-8 sources

 

Rev. June 2010, 2009-10 Humanities Dept. Composition Committee


QUESTION:  What are the learning outcomes, assessments, major course topics, & primary assignments for revised 4-credit WR 227, effective Fall 2010?

Answers:

HUMANITIES DEPARTMENT
COURSE TITLE:
English Composition
COURSE NUMBER: WR 227
COURSE CREDITS: 4

4-CR WR 227 Recommended Prequisites: A passing grade (C or better) in WR 121 or a passing score on the placement exam.

4-CR WR 227 COURSE DESCRIPTION: This transfer course emphasizes forms of writing appropriate in the workplace rather than academic essays. This course addresses the following topics: evaluation of audiences, writing situations, and sources; document design; research processes; visual aids; oral presentations; and collaborative writing. Writing assignments include memos, letters, informal reports, process reports, and research reports.

WR 227 [4-CR] Course Learning OUTCOMES, Assessments:

Upon completion of this course, the successful student will be able to:

Outcome 1. Analyze audiences and writing situations.

Assessment:  Students' work demonstrates understanding of the context in which writing is taking place: the needs, values, and expectations of multiple audiences; conventions of workplace writing (such as timeliness and professional appearance); and cultural considerations.

Outcome 2. Choose document forms and design documents that meet needs of audience and situation.

Assessment: Students write appropriate forms of document (report, proposal, instructions, letter, memo, etc.) for specific communication needs.  Document layout and computer formatting strategies (such as headings, white space, enumerating or bulleting, and font changes) add clarity and meaning to the document by conveying a sense of organization and facilitating. the audiences' access to information.

Outcome 3. Identify and use sources appropriately, including evaluating information for accuracy and reliability.

Assessment: Students' work demonstrates proficiency in critically reading, analyzing, and evaluating sources in order to responsibly incorporate facts, opinions, judgments, and data from research.

 Embedded Information Literacy Proficiency 2 -  Students will be able to:
--Proficiency 2. “Find information efficiently and effectively, using appropriate research tools and search strategies."
[See also below on New LIB 199 and LIB 299 courses in 2010]

Outcome 4. Communicate technical information visually.

Assessment: Students select and design effective  graphics (such as tables, charts, graphs, illustrations) to clearly support written communication, including appropriate documentation, internal references and labels.

Outcome 5. Write ethically and responsibly.

Assessment: Students demonstrate ethical considerations in their writing; act responsibly by using information technologies ethically, incorporating and crediting sources appropriately and without plagiarism, and by consciously avoiding inaccurate or misleading information.

*Embedded Information Literacy Proficiency 5 -  Students will be able to:
--Proficiency 5. “Ethically and legally use information and information technologies.”
[See also below on New LIB 199 and LIB 299 courses in 2010]

Outcome 6. Manage an extensive research writing project.

Assessment:  Students create a search strategy that focuses a research topic on specialized disciplinary knowledge; find information effectively by using appropriate research tools; develop a careful system of note-taking and drafting that avoids plagiarism and fairly represents sources; demonstrate such integral tasks as research proposal, summary, abstract, and outline; and develop competence in one system of documentation.

*Embedded Information Literacy Proficiencies 2, 4, & 7 -  Students will be able to:
--Proficiency 2. “Find information efficiently and effectively, using appropriate research tools and search strategies."
--Proficiency 4.  “Treat research as a multi-stage, recursive process.”
--Proficiency 7.  “Manipulate and manage information, using appropriate tools and technologies.”
[See also below on New LIB 199 and LIB 299 courses in 2010]

Outcome 7. Communicate technical information orally.

Assessment:  Students communicate effectively in a short oral report appropriate to a lay audience; use visual aids; and respond directly to audience questions.

Outcome 8. Work collaboratively to produce technical documents.

Assessment:  Students build responsible teamwork skills in a writing group; and provide peers with suggestions for revising and editing.

WR 227 (4-CR) Course Outline by Major Topics:

  • Defining technical communication and its importance in the contemporary workplace

  • Memoranda

  • Job application Letter

  • Technical Descriptions

  •  Instructions

  • Proposals (informal-memo format)

  • Graphic/Visual Design

  • Technical Reports

  • Oral Presentations

Rev. June 2010, 2009-10 Humanities Dept. Composition Committee

 


UPDATE, Jan. 2011: GOOD NEWS! LIB 127 is again being offered!!
COCC Credit Class Schedule - Spring 2011:
https://oraweb.cocc.edu/2011/201120/fullschedule.htm
LIBRARY - Spring 2011:
https://oraweb.cocc.edu/2011/201120/LIB.htm


How to Contact Cora Agatucci:
Electronic mail:
Cora's Office Location: Grandview 106-B  (Bend campus)
See
Cora's current Schedule (& also by appointment):
http://web.cocc.edu/cagatucci/schedule.htm 

Cora's Office Phone & Voicemail: (541) 383-7522
Humanities Dept. Office (Bend campus): Modoc 226 
Fax:
  (541) 330-4396 - Attention: Cora Agatucci
Cora's COCC Home Page: http://web.cocc.edu/cagatucci/ 


You are here:  Revised AAOT Writing Requirements (effective Fall 2010),
REVISED 4-Credit WR 121, & REVISED 4-Credit WR 122
URL of this webpage: http://web.cocc.edu/cagatucci/classes/wr121/REVAAOT_WR121_WR122.htm
Last Updated: 28 March 2011

1997 - 2011, Cora Agatucci, Professor of English
Humanities Department, Central Oregon Community College

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